A Manual for Cleaning Women

A Manual for Cleaning Women

Selected Stories

Lucia Berlin, Stephen Emerson, Lydia Davis

$9.99

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Description

"I have always had faith that the best writers will rise to the top, like cream, sooner or later, and will become exactly as well-known as they should be-their work talked about, quoted, taught, performed, filmed, set to music, anthologized. Perhaps, with the present collection, Lucia Berlin will begin to gain the attention she deserves." -Lydia Davis

A MANUAL FOR CLEANING WOMEN compiles the best work of the legendary short-story writer Lucia Berlin. With the grit of Raymond Carver, the humor of Grace Paley, and a blend of wit and melancholy all her own, Berlin crafts miracles from the everyday, uncovering moments of grace in the Laundromats and halfway houses of the American Southwest, in the homes of the Bay Area upper class, among switchboard operators and struggling mothers, hitchhikers and bad Christians.

Readers will revel in this remarkable collection from a master of the form and wonder how they'd ever overlooked her in the first place.


Author

Lucia Berlin:

Lucia Berlin (1936–2004) was first published when she was twenty-four in The Atlantic Monthly and in Saul Bellow and Keith Botsford's journal The Noble Savage. Berlin worked brilliantly but sporadically throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s. Her stories are culled from her early childhood in various Western mining towns; her glamorous teenage years in Santiago, Chile; three failed marriages; a lifelong problem with alcoholism; her years spent in Berkeley, New Mexico, and Mexico City; and the various jobs she later held to support her writing and her four sons, including as a high-school teacher, a switchboard operator, a physician's assistant, a nurse, and a cleaning woman.




Lucia Berlin (1936–2004) was first published when she was twenty-four in The Atlantic Monthly and in Saul Bellow and Keith Botsford's journal The Noble Savage. Berlin worked brilliantly but sporadically throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s. Her stories are culled from her early childhood in various Western mining towns; her glamorous teenage years in Santiago, Chile; three failed marriages; a lifelong problem with alcoholism; her years spent in Berkeley, New Mexico, and Mexico City; and the various jobs she later held to support her writing and her four sons, including as a high-school teacher, a switchboard operator, a physician's assistant, a nurse, and a cleaning woman.




Lucia Berlin (1936–2004) was first published when she was twenty-four in The Atlantic Monthly and in Saul Bellow and Keith Botsford's journal The Noble Savage. Berlin worked brilliantly but sporadically throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s. Her stories are culled from her early childhood in various Western mining towns; her glamorous teenage years in Santiago, Chile; three failed marriages; a lifelong problem with alcoholism; her years spent in Berkeley, New Mexico, and Mexico City; and the various jobs she later held to support her writing and her four sons, including as a high-school teacher, a switchboard operator, a physician's assistant, a nurse, and a cleaning woman.

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